Understanding the different types and sources of collagen.

Understanding the different types and sources of collagen.

April 02, 2018

When it comes to choosing a collagen product,  you have choices.

(Hurray for choice!)

It can be harder to choose the best product for your health if you also have a choice in the types of collagen available, but you are not sure which will be best for you or what each type of collagen does.

We thought we'd break it down for you, and help you understand why we choose to use marine collagen for our products that target skin, hair and nail health and support.

The three main types of collagen used for supplements are type I, II and III

Type I Collagen ( 100% found in marine (fish) collagen and also present in smaller amounts in porcine (pig) collagen and some forms of bovine collagen)

Type I Comprises 75-90% of skin, hair, nails, organs, bone, ligaments.
For skin and beauty applications Type I Collagen is considered to be the best. Dermatology research with oral supplementation of collagen has shown that when Type I (overall body) collagen is increased, there are visible results in the appearance of skin. 

Type II Collagen (Chicken collagen, bovine collagen if from cartilage)

Type II collagen makes up the fluids and function of the cartilage and joints. It's main supplemental purpose is for the treatment of joint pain and arthritic conditions, as well as for a dietary protein source. Collagen Type 2 makes up to 10% of the total collagen in the body.

Type III Collagen (found with type I in Porcine (pig) collagen and Bovine collagen if from bovine hide)

Type III collagen is the second most abundant collagen in tissues; most commonly in tissues with elastic properties such as skin, lungs, intestinal walls and walls of blood vessels.
It is also found in fibrous protein in bone, cartilage, dentin (a strengthening coating on teeth), tendons, and other connective tissues.

The pros and cons of the different sources of these types of collagen

 

Marine Collagen (fish)

PROS:

  • Marine collagen peptides are considered to be superior at increasing overall body collagen (Type 1) and improving skin, hair, nail, and bone quality.
  • Marine collagen is absorbed up to 1.5 times more efficiently into the body, meaning that it has superior bioavailability over bovine or porcine collagen. Because of it's low molecular weight it is absorbed more easily and enters the bloodstream more rapidly.
  • Marine collagen peptides have been gained popularity as nutraceuticals due to their similarity to the human collagen structure.

CONS:

  • Fish collagen peptides are generally more expensive.
  • Not suitable for those that have an allergy to fish

Bovine Collagen
PROS:

  • Bovine collagen peptides are generally easier to source, and are incorporated into a wide variety of collagen supplements, largely due to the high accessibility of bovine materials.
  • Because Bovine collagen contains type III and some type I collagen (unless from cartilage making it type II) , it can be effective for support of skin, hair and nails.
  • Bovine collagen from cartilage can be highly effective for joint pain and recovery. 

 CONS:

  • Not considered as effective as fish collagen peptides in raising overall body collagen levels for skin, hair and nails.
  • Should always be from free range, grass fed, hormone free, cows. This can make it more expensive also. 

 

Porcine (pig) Collagen
PROS:

  • Porcine collagen peptides are usually lower cost, and are incorporated into a wide variety of collagen supplements, largely due to the high accessibility of porcine materials.
  • Like Bovine collagen, porcine collagen contains type III and some type I collagen, it can be effective for support of skin, hair and nails.

CONS:

  • Not considered as effective as fish collagen peptides in raising overall body collagen levels.
  • Not thought to be as easily absorbed as marine collagen.
  • Should always come from free range, hormone free pig material, which will make it more expensive. 

Chicken/Bovine collagen (if from cartilage) Type II collagen

PROS:

  • Chicken collagen peptides are considered to be most effective for supporting cartilage in the body.
  • Studied for its role in supporting mobility issues, and reducing pain associated with arthritic conditions.
CONS:
  • Not considered an ingredient for reducing the visible effects of aging in skin.

 

The use of collagen supplements has been well studied, and continues to be studied as the rise in popularity of products containing collagen grows.

At Jeuneora  we choose to use only marine collagen type I in our Renew+, AquaGlow, and Hair, Skin and Nail capsules when it comes to supporting anti-aging, and the health of hair, nails and gut health.

We use NZ sourced free range, pasture fed, hormone free bovine type II of the highest quality in our Whey Protein and Collagen Complex Recovery and Repair Formula.

We hope that the information in this post helps inform you about the different types of collagen available, and the purpose of each of these different types.